Abstract

Apoptosis is a physiological cell death process that plays a critical role in development, homeostasis, and immune defense of multicellular animals. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) constitute a family of proteins that possess between one and three baculovirus IAP repeats. Some of them also have a really interesting new gene finger domain, and can prevent cell death by binding and inhibiting active caspases, but are regulated by IAP antagonists. Some evidence also indicates that IAP can modulate the cell cycle and signal transduction. The three main factors, IAPs, IAP antagonists, and caspases, are involved in regulating the progress of apoptosis in many species. Many studies and assumptions have been focused on the anfractuous interactions between these three main factors to explore their real functional model in order to develop potential anticancer drugs. In this review, we describe the classification, molecular structures, and properties of IAPs and discuss the mechanisms of apoptosis. We also discuss the promising significance of clinical applications of IAPs in the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy.