Objective: With universal hearing screening, children are identified for cochlear implantation at much earlier ages; many develop age-appropriate language skills, although variability in language outcomes exists. More recently, research has looked at other neuropsychological variables that relate to or predict language development in children with cochlear implants. Working memory, executive functioning and motor skills have been demonstrated to be at risk in children with cochlear implants; visual perceptual abilities have been described as relatively preserved. Little work has been done to determine the progression of brain development in children who experience early sensory deprivation only then to receive sensory input. In children who are deaf or blind, brain areas devoted to those senses serve other senses. Cochlear implants reintroduce auditory input into a system that might be used by another sensory modality. The impact of this interaction has not been studied or discussed much in the literature. Method: An 8-year-old...

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