Objective: HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) describes the progressive stages of cognitive and functional impairments typically seen among HIV-infected individuals. With the advent of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV-infected individuals are achieving suppressed viral loads and stable neurocognitive and functional abilities over long-term neuropsychological follow-up. This suggests HAND may not represent a progressive condition in the era of cART. To expand upon this current conceptualization, we present a case of HAND with progressive neurocognitive and functional impairments despite long-term cART treatment. Method: A 53-year-old, right-handed, Caucasian man was referred to repeat neuropsychological assessment. Referral complaints included stable, if not improved cognitive performance related to processing speed and memory relative to comprehensive neuropsychological assessments completed 2- and 4-years prior. An abbreviated neuropsychological assessment was planned to characterize his ongoing cognitive and mood complaints. Results: Performance on initial testing was significantly below expectations, in the context of satisfactory effort. The decision was then...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.