Objective: Obtaining a history of concussion often relies on self-report information, yet little evidence exists regarding the reliability of this method, particularly among aging and cognitively impaired populations. To this end, we examined the reliability of self-reported concussions among a large national sample of older adults with and without cognitive impairment across two time points. Method: Data obtained from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center included responses regarding history of TBI with loss of consciousness <5 minutes from healthy subjects and those with a primary diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) or Alzheimer's disease (AD). We examined percent agreement between reports provided at baseline and 6-18 months later for all subjects who endorsed a history of TBI more than one year prior to baseline examination. To explore the impact of cognitive impairment on reporting consistency, logistic regression assessed whether Clinical Dementia Rating Scale sum-of-boxes scores (CDR-SB), a global rating of impairment,...

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