Objective: The aim of this study was to examine whether education level differentially buffers cognitive decline in Caucasian and African American older adults. It was hypothesized that educational attainment would confer greater advantage to African Americans relative to Caucasians during the cognitive aging process. Method: A 2×2 analysis of variance was conducted on a sample of 364 community-dwelling older adults (mean age = 68.2, 70.6% Caucasian, 63.2% female) participating in the Family Relationships in Late Life Study with race (Caucasian and African American) and education ( high school and > high school) as between-subjects factors. Cognition, as measured by the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), served as the dependent variable. Results: Consistent with previous findings, significant main effects indicated that African Americans [F(1, 360) = 48.43, p < .001] and individuals with less education [F(1, 360) = 42.85, p < .001] evidenced lower cognitive functioning. As...

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