Objective: First, we expected to replicate reports that older adults are impaired in reversal learning abilities compared to younger adults. Next, we aimed to determine if reversal learning abilities differed when cognitively normal older adults are dichotomized into impaired and unimpaired subsets. Method: Participants were 32 younger adults (Age: M = 20.88, SD = 2.76; Men = 8) and 29 older adults (Age: M = 72.62, SD = 8.11; Men = 2) who completed a battery of standardized neuropsychological tests including the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R). Then, all completed the Reversal Task (RT) in which contingencies were learned and then reversed. Older adults were classified as impaired or unimpaired based on performance on the delayed-recall subtest of the HVLT-R. Results: Older adults committed more errors (Cohen's d = 0.99; p < .001)...

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