Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether older adults with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), but no formal cognitive deficits, perform worse on objective memory tests than older adults without SCI. Identifying tests that are sensitive to initial memory decline has potential clinical utility for classifying those at risk for dementia. Method: Participants were 68 healthy older adults (M = 67.78 years) from the US (n = 41) and the Netherlands (n = 27), grouped into SCI (n = 27) and control groups (n = 41) based on self-reported memory concerns. Participants completed the Wechsler Memory Scale – Fourth Edition (WMS-IV), Memory Functioning Questionnaire (MFQ), and depression and personality scales. Data were analyzed using independent samples t-tests (Bonferroni-corrected p < 0.01) and partial correlations, controlling for age, gender, and study site. Results: SCI and controls did not differ on demographics, subclinical depressive symptoms, or personality. SCI participants trended...

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