Objective: Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is characterized by memory impairment with preserved daily functioning and is a risk factor for developing dementia (Petersen, 2004). Individuals with MCI show poor learning, retention, and consolidation of new information. Little research has investigated recall discriminability in MCI. Recall discriminability is a new measure that accounts for both recall and intrusions in a single score. Our objective was to investigate different types of recall discriminability (i.e., total, immediate, delayed, free, & cued) in MCI and typically aging adults (NCI). Method: Thirty-two MCI and 103 NCI cases were drawn from a population-based study. Measures of total, immediate, delayed, free, and cued recall discriminability were derived following administration of the California Verbal Learning Test-II. A series of ANCOVAs comprised of one between group variable (MCI vs. NCI) were performed. Immediate recall performance during the initial wordlist learning trials and 3MS scores were co-varied. Results were...

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