Objective: There is a need to identify neuropsychological markers that are sensitive to early detection and tracking of preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) decline. Impaired episodic memory is a hallmark of early AD, but whether decline occurs in non-memory aspects of cognition remains unclear. Here, we sought to determine whether a theoretically driven factor structure would characterize cognitive functioning in preclinical autosomal-dominant AD, and would help to identify individuals at high risk for AD. We hypothesized that the cognitive variables under investigation would be organized into 3 primary factors: executive function, episodic memory, and processing speed. Method: We assessed 1143 cognitively-normal young adults from a Colombian kindred with familial AD (230 PSEN1 mutation carriers, and 913 non-carrier family members) using seven measures derived from five cognitive tests. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the fit of a hypothesized three-factor model comprising memory, executive functioning and psychomotor speed. Results: The...

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