Objective: Deficits in inhibitory control, working memory and other executive functions (EF) have been proposed as core components of the etiology of ADHD. However, only about 35% to 50% of children with ADHD show deficits relative to normative samples on tests of EF, suggesting poor sensitivity (Nigg et al., 2005). Recently, applications of the Diffusion Model (DM) that simultaneously considers both error rate and RT data in a manner that is unique to most scoring algorithms for EF tasks, have found that children with ADHD show slower drift rates than typically-developing peers. The current study compared the utility of the DM parameter of drift rate for identifying children with ADHD, with that of two other standard EF measures. Method: Children with ADHD (N = 268) and age-matched typically developing controls (N = 114) completed the Stop-Signal Reaction Time (SSRT) task (response inhibition), and a complex reading span task (working memory)....

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