Objective: Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms are reported at high base rates in college students. Depression and anxiety are two disorders with highly comorbid symptom presentations. Sleep and fatigue may also be related to ADHD complaints, especially in a population with poor sleep hygiene. We examined the relationship between self-reported ADHD symptoms and sleep. Method: Data from 103 undergraduate participants in a larger sleep/EEG study (61 female, mean age 19.4) were analyzed. None reported prior ADHD diagnosis or met criteria for Restless Legs Syndrome/sleep apnea per sleep evaluation. For the present study, data from self-report measures and a computerized sustained attention task were analyzed. Variables of interest included measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, morningness/eveningness, daytime sleepiness, sleep routine, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The Conner's Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS) Subscale E (DSM inattentive symptoms) was used as an index of ADHD complaints. Results: Higher CAARS...

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