Objective: To test whether WISC-IV General Ability Index (GAI) and Cognitive Proficiency Index (CPI) explain greater variance in academic fluency tasks than Full-Scale Intelligence (FSIQ). Method: Data were collected from a de-identified neuropsychology database at a South Florida community clinic. Participants (N = 140) represented a mixed clinical sample; average age 11.34 (SD = 2.61); average education 5.46 (SD = 2.53); 52.9% Caucasian. A significance level of .05 was used for all analyses. Results: Reading Fluency was significantly predicted by GAI and CPI in step 1. In step two, only the interaction term was statistically significant, and significantly increased the explained variance by 2.8%. For Mathematics Fluency, both GAI and CPI were significant predictors in step 1 FSIQ uniquely improved the degree of explained variance by 2.1% (F = 21.93, R2adj. = .37). Writing Fluency was significantly predicted by both GAI and CPI in step 1. FSIQ uniquely improved the...

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