Objective: The terms mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion may evoke different expectations for people who sustain such an injury. Expectations are important because previous researchers have demonstrated that expected symptoms at the time of injury were the best predictors of actual symptoms post-injury. The current study investigated the effect of terminology on various outcome expectations. Method: Participants (n = 132) read a vignette depicting a person sustaining an mTBI in a motor vehicle accident. Three groups were told that they had either sustained a concussion, mTBI or there was no diagnosis. Participants reported expectations regarding symptoms, consequences, self-efficacy, recovery from injury, length of recovery, positive and negative changes in life perspective, and undesirability of the injury. Participants also reported their familiarity with the terminology. Results: There was an effect of terminology on expected symptoms, F(2, 129) = 3.17, p = .045. The diagnosis of “concussion” was associated with...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.