Objective: Impulsivity is elevated in individuals with substance use disorder (SUD) as are inefficiencies in information processing and executive functions (EFs). We hypothesized that (a) trait-based measures of impulsivity would remain stable across a ten-day period of initial abstinence and (b) neuropsychological performance on speeded tests of EFs would be negatively related to impulsivity. Method: Participants (N = 16) with SUD completed Trail Making Test A and B, the Victoria Stroop Task, and the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale. Data were collected upon entry to a hospital-based residential treatment program and then again prior to discharge, approximately ten days later. Hypothesis one was examined using dependent t-tests and hypothesis two was examined using Pearson's correlation coefficients. Results: Partially consistent with the first hypothesis, impulsivity remained stable over time with the exception of one facet of impulsivity, (lack of) premeditation, which significantly decreased from T1 to T2. Hypothesis two was also partially...

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