Objective: Lightning strikes can result in thermal, electrical and blast injuries, as well as secondary mechanical falls (Cherington, 2003), which can lead to impairments across all neuropsychological domains (Duff & McCaffrey, 2001). This case provides an example of how a lightning strike can lead to impaired neurodevelopment and a decline in neurocognitive abilities, while sparing social communication. Method: A 52 year-old, right-handed, Caucasian female was struck by lightning at ten years of age, experienced cardiac arrest for several minutes, was hospitalized for months, and did not receive any formal rehabilitation due to her family's cultural values. She presented with profound developmental disabilities and daily hallucinations. Results: Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, 5th Edition, Full Scale IQ = 44, Non-Verbal Index = 44, Verbal Index = 48, MoCA: 2/30 points, Receptive and Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Tests, 4th Edition, Severely impaired, Wide Range Achievement Test, 4th Edition, Impaired reading and writing, Informant ratings...

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