Objective: Cognitive impairment is common among individuals with substance use disorders, and is associated with poorer treatment outcomes. Given the social and financial costs of substance abuse, adjunctive interventions that improve the efficacy of extant treatments are urgently needed. The current study evaluated whether an eight-week, manualized, multimodal group cognitive rehabilitation intervention, Motivationally-Enhanced Compensatory Cognitive Training (ME-CCT), improved outcomes in Veterans with a history of substance use disorders. Method: The ME-CCT intervention was piloted in three groups of Veterans at the Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System. All Veterans had a history of substance use disorder and were abstinent at the time of the intervention. Participants were generally older (M = 59.47 years), had no history of psychotic disorders, and completed pre- and post-group questionnaire packets measuring subjective cognitive complaints, everyday functioning, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and use of compensatory cognitive strategies (n = 17). Significant differences between pre- and post-treatment measures...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.