Objective: Reading development requires the mapping between symbol and sound representations. This study investigated whether this core feature of reading correlates uniquely with a non-alphabetic measure of cross-model abstraction that is hypothesized to underlie symbol-sound mapping. Method: Undergraduate students (n = 29) were administered standardized measures (Woodcock-Johnson, 4th Ed.) of reading skills (i.e., isolated word reading, orthographic-phonological mapping, phonological awareness) and an experimental measure of symbol-sound mapping (i.e., Bouba-Kiki task). In the Bouba-Kiki task, participants hear nonsense bi-syllables while simultaneously shown a pair of nonsensical images, and then instructed to match the bi-syllables with one of the nonsensical shapes. The shapes of the phonemic inflection of bi-syllables are either sharp (/kee-kee/; unrounded vowel) or bulbous (/boh-bah/; rounded vowel). The nonsensical images mimicked the sharp or bulbous contours. Results: Approximately 69% of the participants demonstrated above-chance performance on the Bouba-Kiki task. The average response on the Bouba-Kiki task (6.45/10) was significantly...

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