Objective: This study examined academic performance in a pediatric sample with acquired neurological injuries. It was hypothesized that deficits would emerge between groups on tasks that require fluency, reasoning, comprehension, and knowledge retrieval. Method: A non-experimental design investigated academic differences between the following disorders: stroke, tumor, cerebral palsy, meningitis and hydrocephalus, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, muscular dystrophy, and neurological impairment (non-specified). Selection criteria included history of neurological injury with no additional diagnoses. The mean age was 12 (SD = 3.3) and 55% of participants (N = 86) were female. Three MANOVAs were conducted using the disorder group as the independent variable. Dependent variables included subtests measuring reading comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency; written expression and fluency; and math calculation, reasoning, and fluency from the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement, Third Edition (Woodcock-Johnson, McGrew, & Mather, 2001). Results: There was a statistically significant difference between group disorders on the...

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