Abstract

Abstract

A validation study using 62 subjects was conducted on the Multidimensional Investigation of Neuropsychological Dissimulation (MIND), a new neuropsychological instrument used to detect exaggeration of brain-injury symptoms. This instrument has eight scoring indices that use multiple, empirically based strategies to detect poor effort. Discriminant function analysis was used to classify three groups of subjects: normals responding in a sincere manner (N = 24); normals who were educated about mild to moderate head injuries and given substantial incentives to malinger without obvious detection (N = 21); and clinically diagnosed, brain-injured patients with mild to moderate impairments (N = 17). A univariate F test indicated significant group differences on six of the eight original predictor variables. Using these six variables, there was an overall classification rate of 68%, reflecting only a 10% false negative rate in the dissimulating group. For a two-group classification (i.e., dissimulating and mildly to moderately brain-injured subjects), an 82% overall accuracy rate was achieved. The MIND appears to have potential for identifying individuals exaggerating mild to moderate neuropsychological deficits.

Author notes

1
Also corresponding author.