Abstract

Data from a clinical sample of children and adolescents were used to examine the characteristics of the Frontal Lobe/Executive Control (FLEC) scale of the Behavior Assessment System for Children Parent Rating Scales, including preliminary evidence of the scale's clinical utility and relationship to other behavioral measures of executive function and characteristics of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Results indicate that participants in the ADHD and other clinical groups received very similar scores on the FLEC scale, and both groups were rated significantly higher in behaviors associated with executive dysfunction than were participants in the no diagnosis group. Correlational results indicate that scores on the FLEC scale were significantly correlated with scores on the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Parent Form and Conners' Parent Rating Scales Revised—Short Form. Based on our results, the FLEC scale appears to be a useful behavioral rating tool in the assessment of executive function that may serve as a supplement to more traditional measures.

Author notes

A preliminary version of this article was presented at the annual meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, March 2006, Anaheim, CA.