Abstract

The present study examined the convergent and divergent validity of the Gordon Diagnostic System (GDS) as a measure of attention in adults by examining correlations between GDS scores and scores on other attentional and non-attentional measures in 77 veterans (4 women and 73 men) referred for neuropsychological evaluation. Scores on the GDS were neither significantly correlated with scores on other attentional nor non-attentional measures. Participants were then divided into two groups, those who scored lower (<1S.D. below the published normative mean) and higher on the GDS for the Vigilance and Distractibility tasks separately. Participants with lower GDS scores on the Vigilance task performed more poorly on the Trailmaking Test, Part B than those with higher GDS scores. There were no other group differences on tests of attentional or non-attentional functions. These results do not provide strong support for the convergent and divergent validity of the GDS as a measure of attention in adults.