Abstract

Objective: This study examined associations between baseline reporting of psychiatric symptoms and reversion of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) to normal cognition at 3-year follow-up. Method: Data from the National Alzheimer's Coordination Center included 1778 MCI subjects (50.60% male; mean age = 72.47 ± 9.80), among whom 817 (45.9%) met criteria for amnestic, single-domain MCI, 624 (35.1%) amnestic, multiple-domain, 231 (13.0%) non-amnestic, single-domain, and 106 (6.0%) non-amnestic, multiple-domain at initial visit. These subjects then returned for 3 subsequent annual visits. Chi-square tests were used to determine associations between presence of baseline psychiatric symptoms reported in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire and MCI group trajectories at 3-years. Results: At 3-years, 265 (14.9%) subjects reverted to normal, 670 (37.7%) remained MCI, 753 (42.3%) progressed to dementia, and 90 (5.1%) became “impaired/not MCI”. Compared to those whose diagnosis remained MCI, reverters reported significantly lower depression (χ2 = 6.48, phi = −.08), apathy (χ2 = 7.60, phi = −.09), disinhibition (χ2 = 6.48, phi = −.08), night-time behaviors (χ2 = 7.23, phi = −.09), and appetite changes (χ2 = 4.35, phi = −.07). Compared to the progressors, reverters reported significantly lower agitation (χ2 = 4.13, phi = .07), depression (χ2 = 15.47, phi = .13), anxiety (χ2 = 13.16, phi = .12), apathy (χ2 = 25.17, phi = .17), disinhibition (χ2 = 13.56, phi = .123), irritability (χ2 = 6.27, phi = .08), motor disturbance (χ2 = 6.16, phi = .08), night-time behaviors (χ2 = 11.12, phi = .11), and appetite changes (χ2 = 10.17, phi = .11). Further, reverters reported significantly fewer night-time behaviors (χ2 = 5.42, phi = .13) compared to “impaired/not MCI” subjects. Conclusion(s): Significantly fewer baseline reports of psychiatric symptoms are associated with reversion from MCI to normal cognition.