Abstract

Objective: ADHD is commonly marked by difficulties in attention regulation and everyday executive functioning. The relationship between the two, however, is not commonly discussed. The current study sought to evaluate the relationship between sustained attention and parental perception of everyday executive functioning in a sample of children and adolescents with ADHD. Method: An archival data set was utilized for the current study. Participants (n = 80) included children and adolescents previously evaluated at an outpatient Neuropsychology clinic. The sample was 71.3% male and 28.7% female, with a mean age of 9.27 years, and a mean educational level of 4 years. All participants completed the CPT-II while parents/caregivers completed the BRIEF. Results: Results demonstrated performance on the CPT-II was largely unrelated to parental perception of everyday executive functioning. Only a few isolated correlations met statistical significance. Reaction time on the CPT was significantly related to increased difficulties in Inhibition (r = .289, p = .005), Emotional Control (r = .244, p = .017), and Overall Behavioral Regulation (r = .265, p = .009). In addition, Perseveration rates on the CPT-II was significantly related to increased difficulties in Inhibition (r = .279, p = .006), Emotional Control (r = .226, p = .028), and Overall Behavioral Regulation (r = .235, p = .022. Conclusion(s): Findings suggest the role aspects of sustained and selective attention play in everyday executive functioning within the ADHD population. Demonstration of these links may highlight areas in which interventions may be directed.