Abstract

Objective: Exploratory analysis of a Spanish list-learning test in the Miami Attention and Memory Instrument (MAMI). Examined demographic variables such as age, gender, and level of education among the normative sample and provided adjusted means to enhance clinical utility. Method: Normative data were collected among Spanish speaking normal controls. Correlations were used to identify associations of scores with age, gender, and level of education. Adjusted means were provided for groups whose scores were significantly correlated to demographic factors. Results: Normative sample consisted of 113 individuals (30% male) with a mean age of 40.47 (SD = 24.34) and 13.80 (SD = 4.39) years of education. Age was significantly correlated with total score (r = −.178, p = .00), immediate recall (r = −6.32, p = .00), and delayed recall (r = −.622, p = .00). Education was significantly correlated with total score (.387, p = .00), immediate recall (r = .236, p = .00), and delayed recall (r = .275, p = .00). Gender was not significantly correlated with any scores. Interaction between age and education was also not significant (F = 1.025, p = 0.465). Norms where stratified to four age and education groups. Adjusted means were provided for each for these groups. Total score mean ranged from 39.12 to 55.5 for age and from 37.45 to 52.68 by education. Conclusion(s): The MAMI-LV has cultural relevance and allows for evaluation of minority patients. Demographic factors (age, education) are significantly correlated with core scores on the MAMI-LV. Clinical utility of this measure can be enhanced if means are adjusted for age and education.