Abstract

Objective: This study examines the relationship between the WAIS-IV Perceptual Reasoning and Processing Speed indices to performance on the driving simulator in a normal adult population. Method: Participants included 45 males and 59 females, with an average age of 31.54 (SD = 14.42) and average education of 15.40 (SD = 2.23). Those with psychiatric or neurological issues were excluded. The data was derived from an on-going de-identified database of normal adults given the WAIS-IV and a driving simulation in which their driving errors were categorized and recorded. Results: Pearson correlation was conducted between each index and total driving errors. At p < .05, Perceptual Reasoning Index was significantly correlated with Simulator Total Tickets/Violations (r = −.199). At p < .05, Processing Speed Index was significantly correlated with Simulator Total Tickets/Violations (r = −.240). Conclusion(s): Results revealed several significant inverse relationships between WAIS-IV Perceptual Reasoning and Processing Speed indices and simulator errors that involve complying with driving laws. As scores on these two indices increase, an individual's total tickets and violations decrease. Although significant results were achieved, Pearson's correlation does not indicate a strong relationship in that the skills measured on the WAIS-IV are not adequate indicators of driving ability. This could be imply that multiple factors such as motor skills, executive functioning, attention, and vision have a stronger relationship to the reduction of driving errors more so than processing speed and perceptual reasoning skills. Future studies should further examine driving ability within the context of multiple cognitive, medical and motor skills.