Objective: In the present study, we sought to determine whether adherence to feedback recommendations improves satisfaction with neuropsychological services (NPs). Method: Participants were recruited from a University Medical Center to participate in the study. Responses from 69 patients and 36 caregiver recipients of NPs were included in the study. Two hierarchical regressions (patient vs. caregiver) were employed to determine whether receipt of feedback [step 1], along with adherence to feedback [step 2] predict satisfaction with NPs. Results: In the patient participant model, receipt of feedback did not contribute significantly to the regression model, F (1,67) = .031, p > .05 and did not contribute to the variance in satisfaction with NPs. Introducing the feedback adherence variable explained 3.4% of variation in satisfaction with NPs and this change in R2 was not significant, F (2,66) = 1.170, p > .05. Conversely, in the caregiver participant model, receipt of feedback contributed significantly to the regression model, F (1,34) = 5.432, p = .026 and significantly contributed to the variance in satisfaction with NPs. Introducing the feedback adherence variable explained 15.3% of variation in satisfaction with NPs and this change in R2 was marginally significant, F (2,33) = 2.987, p = .064. Conclusion: The present findings provide preliminary evidence that relative to patient participants, caregivers are more likely to identify the clinical utility of NPs. A larger sample size might elucidate whether feedback adherence influences satisfaction with NPs. The role of feedback adherence on satisfaction with NPs is a novel concept and one that warrants further investigation.