Objective: Auditory and visual sustained attention on reading ability in low-skilled readers was observed. Based on the dual-route hypothesis decoding and fluency were expected to be related to auditory sustained attention, and comprehension to visual attention. Method: 19 (10 male) low readers aged 6 to 8 years completed the TOVA visual and auditory conditions, a 2-subtest estimated IQ, TOWRE-2, and GORT-5. Participants were in general education K, 1 or 2 grades. Regression models tested the relative influence of auditory and visual sustained attention on reading decoding and fluency, with estimated PIQ controlled. Results: Decoding, auditory attention accounted for 39% of variance in decoding, visual sustained attention accounted for 23% of variance in separate regressions. Neither auditory nor visual attention was significantly more related to decoding with the other controlled in the model. Fluency. Auditory attention accounted for 26% of variance and visual attention accounted for 24% of variance in separate regressions. Neither auditory nor visual attention was significantly more related to fluency with the other controlled in the model. Comprehension, auditory attention significantly accounted for 35% of variance and visual attention did not significantly account for variance. Conclusion: The results suggest a developmental perspective in reading; if low-skilled readers have not mastered decoding, a fluency or comprehension task will likely represent a measure of decoding due to difficulties recognizing the functions of sounds in words. Visual attention was interpreted as a suppressor variable due to negative beta weights. This suggests the need for a broad attention variable when considering barriers to success in low-skilled readers.