Objective: The current study evaluated the reliability of a computerized measure to assess processing speed in children with a recent history of concussion. Research suggests that computerized tests are equivalently sensitive as traditional paper-pencil tests when used for concussion evaluations (Erlanger, et al, 2003). The CNS-Vital Signs (CNS-VS) is one such measure that has been reliability used with adults (Gualtieri & Johnson, 2006). Brooks and Sherman (2012) utilized the CNS-VS on a general pediatric neurology sample; however, the CNS-VS was not directly compared to traditional neuropsychological measures. The current study compared the processing speed index on the CNS-VS to the processing speed index on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV). Method: Twenty-seven participants, aged 8–16 with a recent history of concussion were included. Children with a premorbid history of a neurological disorder were not eligible to participate. Variables included gender, time since concussion, cause of injury, and premorbid psychological diagnoses. The relationship between processing speed from the WISC-IV and CNS-VS was investigated using a correlation coefficient. Results: There was a strong negative correlation between the two variables, r = .503, n = 27, p < .001. One-way ANOVAs were conducted to explore the impact of gender, time since injury, cause of injury, and premorbid psychological diagnosis, none of which were significant. A significant difference between processing speed on the CNS-VS and WISC-IV was noted. This difference was not related to gender, time since injury, cause of injury, or premorbid psychological diagnoses. Conclusion: The influence of a computerized format and its possible impact on results will be discussed.