Objective: To examine areas of the brain most associated with disorganization/impulsivity via SPECT scans measurement of blood flow at baseline. Method: Participants selected based on scores on a disorganization/impulsivity problems self report. All clients received two SPECT scans, at rest and administration of CPT. Ages ranged from 18 to 92 (M = 40.60, SD = 15.732) and consisted of 60.4% males and 39.5% females. Subjects, who ranged in psychiatric diagnoses, were stratified on two levels of disorganization with a lower quartile (4,201), and higher quartile (3,534). Results: MANOVAs were significant at the .05 level, for disorganization at baseline and concentration,. Those in the lower quartile at baseline showed significantly lower blood flow in the limbic, basal ganglia, occipital, parietal, motor-sensory, temporal, and vermis regions. Those scoring in the lower quartile at concentration showed significantly lower blood flow in the limbic, basal ganglia, right frontal, left occipital, parietal, motor-sensory, temporal, and vermis regions. Conclusion: At rest, high blood flow in brain regions measured are associated with impulsive behaviors and disorganization. At concentration, the lower and higher quartiles continue to differ, suggesting those with higher levels of disorganization have a continued difficulty with impulsive urges more so than those in the lower quartile during the CPT. The right frontal region at concentration becomes significant suggesting an emotional regulation attempting to occur but continued inability to self-regulate focus causing difficulties with impulsivity. All other regions remain active at concentration indicative of individuals with disorganization deficits continuing to have inability to perform at the same level as those with less deficits.