In this sequel to White Mother to a Dark Race: Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880–1940 (2009), a prize-winning comparative study on indigenous child removal in the U.S. West and Australia, Margaret D. Jacobs pursues the story into the post-1945 era. She adds a chapter on Canada, as well as brief personal interludes that reveal the historian at work. As she moves from a period when child placements were institutional to one that emphasized family placements, Jacobs maintains that the global logic of “settler colonialism” endured. Its goal was simple and relentless: to displace indigenous peoples from their lands and deprive them of the resources needed for self-determination.

A Generation Removed: The Fostering and Adoption of Indigenous Children in the Postwar World argues that liberal and humanitarian goals—providing services to children discriminated...

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