We are all, of course, only too familiar with “globalization” understood as a multinational corporate/economic world phenomenon, or more specifically, as Robert Eric Livingston reminds us, as “economic discourses commonly termed neoliberal embodied and administered by institutions such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.” But, Livingston continues, “ethical and political discourses … likewise aspire to global significance” (145). Today, such is also the case for critical discourses in American literary studies, which, in another time, were almost fully grounded and bounded within the US. Such a critical globalization in American literary studies is in...

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