One of the most conspicuous developments in American studies over the last decade has been its transnational turn, the increasing interest in approaching the study of US culture in a more international framework, in terms of both the questions being asked and the resources deployed to answer them. As Priscilla Wald has pointed out, calls to internationalize the study of American culture are not new, but have been voiced at least since the late 1970s (199–201). Nevertheless, they have assumed a new urgency ever since the concept of “globalization,” from the mid-1990s onward, has begun to replace...

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