A popular view in metaphysics is that which propositions are true depends upon how the world is (see, for instance, Bigelow 1988; Lewis 1992; Sider 2001). In more evocative (as well as ontologically committing) language, truth requires ground. This thought then gets used to do some serious work. As Sider (2001: 40) has it, ‘[t]he point of … the principle that truth supervenes on being is to rule out dubious ontologies’. Here, I argue that (at least some) ‘dubious’ ontologies are theoretically virtuous.

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ST: Necessarily, if <p> is true, it would be impossible for <p> to be false unless at least one entity which does not exist were to exist, and at least one entity which exists were not to exist. (Bigelow...

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