This article refutes two important and influential views in one fell stroke. The first is G.E. Moore's view that assertions of the form ‘Q but I don’t believe that Q’ are inherently absurd. The second is Gareth Evans's view that justification to assert Q entails justification to assert that you believe Q. Both views run aground the possibility of being justified in accepting eliminativism about belief. A corollary is that a principle recently defended by John Williams is also false, namely, that justification to believe Q entails justification to believe that you believe Q.

You might be so absorbed in this article that you do not notice that it is raining. It could be raining even though you do not believe that it is raining. If...

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