Consciousness in its transitive use (i.e. consciousness-of) has two different kinds of target: external objects and one’s own mental states. We will call consciousness of external objects ‘external awareness’ and consciousness of mental states ‘internal awareness’. The focus of this article is on the latter case, in which a subject is conscious of one of her/his own mental states. Mental states of which a subject is conscious (or aware) have been called ‘conscious states’ by Armstrong (1968, 1981), Rosenthal (1986, 1990) and Lycan (1987, 1996). We will adopt this usage here, though nothing hangs on how you label cases where the subject is aware of a mental state.1

...

‘Inner sense’ or ‘higher-order perception’ (HOP) theories in...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.