Motivation: Restriction-site–associated genomic markers are a powerful tool for investigating evolutionary questions at the population level, but are limited in their utility at deeper phylogenetic scales where fewer orthologous loci are typically recovered across disparate taxa. While this limitation stems in part from mutations to restriction recognition sites that disrupt data generation, an additional source of data loss comes from the failure to identify homology during bioinformatic analyses. Clustering methods that allow for lower similarity thresholds and the inclusion of indel variation will perform better at assembling RADseq loci at the phylogenetic scale.

Results: PyRAD is a pipeline to assemble de novo RADseq loci with the aim of optimizing coverage across phylogenetic datasets. It uses a wrapper around an alignment-clustering algorithm, which allows for indel variation within and between samples, as well as for incomplete overlap among reads (e.g. paired-end). Here I compare PyRAD with the program Stacks in their performance analyzing a simulated RADseq dataset that includes indel variation. Indels disrupt clustering of homologous loci in Stacks but not in PyRAD, such that the latter recovers more shared loci across disparate taxa. I show through reanalysis of an empirical RADseq dataset that indels are a common feature of such data, even at shallow phylogenetic scales. PyRAD uses parallel processing as well as an optional hierarchical clustering method, which allows it to rapidly assemble phylogenetic datasets with hundreds of sampled individuals.

Availability:Software is written in Python and freely available at http://www.dereneaton.com/software/

Contact: daeaton.chicago@gmail.com

Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

1 INTRODUCTION

Restriction-site–associated DNA libraries (RADseq; Baird et al., 2008) and related genotyping-by-sequencing approaches (e.g. GBS, Etter et al., 2011; ddRADseq, Peterson et al., 2012) take advantage of next-generation sequencing platforms to generate short reads from thousands of potentially homologous loci, across multiple individuals, by targeting genomic regions adjacent to restriction enzyme cut sites. In contrast to whole-genome shotgun data, this provides a more efficient and economical source for performing comparisons across many sampled individuals, making it a popular tool for population genetic analyses (reviewed in Narum et al., 2013). The problem of efficiently obtaining sequence data across many individuals is also relevant to studies at deeper evolutionary time scales, such as genus- or family-level phylogenetics, and it is at this scale that RADseq is now receiving increased attention.

RAD sequences generated in silico from multi-species genome alignments have been shown to retain accurate phylogenetic information over evolutionary divergences as deep as 60 million years (Cariou et al., 2013; Rubin et al., 2012); however, to date, all empirical RADseq studies conducted above the species level were done at much shallower scales (Bergey et al., 2013; Eaton and Ree, 2013; Jones et al., 2013; Keller et al., 2013; Lexer et al., 2013; Nadeau et al., 2013; Stölting et al., 2013; The Heliconius Genome Consortium, 2012; Wagner et al., 2013; Wang et al., 2013). Still, these studies confirm theoretical expectations by demonstrating that concatenated, genome aligned or even individual RADseq loci are capable of recovering well-supported gene trees and species trees. Yet, these studies also demonstrate that large amounts of missing data are a common feature of RADseq, which may limit its applications.

Theoretically, the ultimate scale over which RADseq data will be recovered, and thus phylogenetically useful, is inherently limited by mutations that disrupt restriction recognition sites, causing ‘locus dropout’—manifest as more missing data between more distantly related samples. However, empirically such limits are approached much sooner owing to the loss of data to other technical factors related to data generation and analysis. For example, the choice of restriction enzyme, the size of selected fragments and variation in sequencing coverage across samples all affect the number of loci recovered. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses used to assemble RADseq datasets recover different amounts of data depending on the parameters used to identify and cluster orthologs as well as filter for paralogs (or repetitive DNA regions.) In this article, I focus mainly on the latter aspect of locus dropout: factors limiting the identification (recovery) of orthologous loci when they are present in a dataset.

Few programs are currently available to assemble RADseq data, which currently includes Stacks (Catchen et al., 2011, 2013), Rainbow (Chong et al., 2012) and rtd (Peterson et al., 2012). Here I describe a new software pipeline called PyRAD, which assembles de novo aligned RADseq loci for population-level or phylogenetic analyses, with a particular focus on the analysis of highly divergent samples. PyRAD differs from both Stacks and Rainbow through its use of a global alignment clustering algorithm—performed with a wrapper around the program USEARCH (Edgar, 2010)—which allows for incorporation of indel variation while identifying homology. In this way, PyRAD is more similar to rtd, which uses a graph clustering algorithm that also allows for indels. PyRAD stands apart from these programs in its speed, flexibility for analyzing multiple RADseq data types, its scalability to extremely large and divergent datasets and its ease of use. Below I describe the PyRAD pipeline in detail. I then demonstrate its performance on simulated and empirical datasets and compare the results with those of Stacks, which is currently the most commonly used alternative software.

2 METHODS

2.1 Summary of a de novo assembly

PyRAD requires as dependencies only the executable programs USEARCH (Edgar, 2010) and MUSCLE (Edgar, 2004), in addition to the common Python packages Scipy and Numpy. It runs on Mac and Linux, is accessed through a command-line interface and uses a modular framework with a full analysis composed of seven sequential steps:

  1. De-multiplexing (separate by barcodes)

  2. Quality filtering and removal of barcodes, cut sites and adapters

  3. Clustering within samples and alignment

  4. Joint estimation of error rate and heterozygosity

  5. Consensus base calling and paralog detection

  6. Clustering across samples

  7. Alignment across samples, filtering and formatting

The de-multiplexing step (1) separates raw FASTQ formatted sequence data into separate files for each sample, allowing a user set maximum number of mismatches (errors) in a barcode. If samples are already de-multiplexed, this step can be skipped. Filtering (2) then removes barcodes and Illumina adapters, if present, and filters reads by their quality scores, replacing base calls below a user-set limit with an ambiguous base (N). Reads with more than a user-defined number of Ns are discarded. The clustering step (3) first collapses replicate sequences into individual records while retaining their total number of occurrences. Sequence order is randomized and clustering is performed using USEARCH with all heuristic options turned off. This creates clusters (stacks) by matching each sequential sequence to a’seed’ sequence that came before it, or else creating a new seed. The resulting stacks are aligned with MUSCLE.

The next step (4) uses the maximum likelihood equation of Lynch (2008) to jointly estimate the mean heterozygosity and sequencing error rate from the base frequencies at each site across all stacks in an individual (with greater than a set minimum depth of coverage), and uses these values (5) to calculate the binomial probability a site is homozygous (aa or bb) versus heterozygous (ab) (Li et al., 2008). A base call is only made if the depth of coverage is above a user-set minimum, and high enough to make a statistical base call, else it is called undetermined (N). Consensus sequences containing more than a maximum number of undetermined sites are discarded. To filter for paralogs (or repetitive or high copy number DNA regions, hereafter referred to collectively as ‘paralogs’ for simplicity), consensus sequences are also discarded if they contain more than a maximum number of heterozygous sites or more than the allowed number of haplotypes (two for diploids).

Putative orthologs are then identified by clustering consensus loci across samples in USEARCH, using only one allele from each consensus sequence to measure sequence similarity, but retaining data for both (or multiple) alleles (6). The resulting stacks are aligned and filtered once again for paralogs before being output in a variety of familiar formats as individual or concatenated loci (e.g. Fasta, Phylip, Nexus), or in several custom formats [e.g. Haplotypes, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and unlinked SNPs] (7). The filter applied in this step makes use of a user-set maximum for the number of shared heterozygous sites across all samples in the dataset (maxSharedH). For a phylogenetic scale dataset the expectation for this number is unknown, but should be fairly low under the assumption that polymorphisms are less likely to be retained over deep divergences than are fixed differences between paralogs. Loci containing one or more heterozygous sites shared across more than ‘maxSharedH’ samples are thus discarded as potential paralogs. Step 7 can be repeated while substituting different subsets of taxa, and requiring different amounts of coverage across them, to construct datasets of varying size and completeness.

2.2 Hierarchical clustering for large datasets

As the size and scope of RADseq studies continue to grow, the computational time required to assemble datasets can become burdensome. In PyRAD the limiting step for large data is often among-sample clustering (step 5), which is not parallelized. Clustering time scales with the total number of unique stacks and studies with many samples (>100) can quickly accumulate many low coverage or singleton loci that greatly slow run times. To speed this step, an optional hierarchical clustering approach that splits the job into smaller parallelized units can be implemented. Here, loci are first clustered across samples within user-defined clades, with each clade using a separate processor. The seeds of these stacks are then used to cluster with seeds of stacks from other clades (Fig. 1) before a final stack is reconstructed from the matches to each seed from each hierarchical clustering step. A further gain in speed can be attained by excluding at each step loci that do not cluster with at least some minimum number of other samples, under the assumption that such loci are less likely to match with more distant relatives in the next step. Although this gain in speed comes at the cost of excluding loci with low taxon coverage, such loci are typically of little use in downstream analyses.

Fig. 1.

Optional hierarchical clustering approach for fast across-sample clustering of large datasets in PyRAD. In the first iteration, clustering is performed among samples within each user-defined clade (a, b and c). Dotted lines show clustering of sequences to the randomly assigned seed sequence in each stack. In subsequent steps, the seeds of stacks from previous steps are clustered with the seeds of stacks from other clades. Finally, matches to the seeds at each hierarchical step are reconstructed to build the full stack. A minimum cluster size can be set for each iteration to further increase speed at the cost of accuracy; in the example (min2) singleton loci are removed, causing data from clade b to be lost

Fig. 1.

Optional hierarchical clustering approach for fast across-sample clustering of large datasets in PyRAD. In the first iteration, clustering is performed among samples within each user-defined clade (a, b and c). Dotted lines show clustering of sequences to the randomly assigned seed sequence in each stack. In subsequent steps, the seeds of stacks from previous steps are clustered with the seeds of stacks from other clades. Finally, matches to the seeds at each hierarchical step are reconstructed to build the full stack. A minimum cluster size can be set for each iteration to further increase speed at the cost of accuracy; in the example (min2) singleton loci are removed, causing data from clade b to be lost

2.3 Simulations

Sequence data were simulated on a species tree with 12 ingroup samples and one outgroup sample (Fig. 2) under a coalescent model within the Python package Egglib (Mita and Siol, 2012). Effective population size (50 000) and per base mutation rate (7 × 109) were constant across taxa, with the deepest divergence at 16 coalescent units. I simulated 10 K loci for each of the 12 ingroup taxa at 20× coverage, with two alleles sampled from one diploid sample at 10× depth each. Reads were trimmed to 100 bp and a 6 bp barcode and 5 bp restriction recognition site were attached. Indels were introduced by sampling SNPs in the 12 ingroup taxa relative to the outgroup taxon at a probability of 0.0, 0.02 or 0.05, converting the derived allele into a deletion. This yielded three datasets that I refer to as the noIndel, lowIndel and highIndel datasets.

Fig. 2.

Species tree on which RADseq data were simulated under a coalescent model. Divergence times are in coalescent units. Mutations relative to the outgroup X were sampled at different frequencies to simulate deletions in three different datasets and also to simulate disruption of the restriction recognition site in one dataset

Fig. 2.

Species tree on which RADseq data were simulated under a coalescent model. Divergence times are in coalescent units. Mutations relative to the outgroup X were sampled at different frequencies to simulate deletions in three different datasets and also to simulate disruption of the restriction recognition site in one dataset

A larger dataset was also simulated on the same species tree to demonstrate the efficiency of the hierarchical clustering approach. In this case, 500 K loci were generated with no indels but allowing locus dropout through mutations that arise in a restriction recognition site relative to the outgroup. For this, I used a large region as the recognition site to create significant amounts of missing data between samples as expected in a deeply divergent phylogenetic dataset. This led to a dataset where each individual sample contained only ∼150 K loci, but for which the total dataset comprised 500 K loci potentially shared across samples. Thus, the within-sample clustering step is relatively fast, whereas the across-sample clustering is much more computationally intensive, and benefits from the use of the hierarchical clustering. I refer to this as the noIndel-m dataset.

All simulated datasets were compared using PyRAD v.1.621 and Stacks v.1.08. To the extent possible I used analagous parameters settings for both programs. For example, the clustering threshold of 85% in PyRAD is equivalent to 15 base differences in Stacks (parameters -m6, -M13, -N15, -n15) given read lengths of 100 bp. A minimum stack depth of six was used in all analyses. Paralog filtering was not implemented on simulated data. The large noIndel-m dataset was run with the same parameter settings, but was additionally run in PyRAD using a two-step hierarchical clustering approach. This first clustered loci within each of the three large four-taxon clades then exluded any loci not shared across all four taxa within the clade, before subsequently clustering loci across clades.

2.4 Empirical data

A published RADseq dataset from Eaton and Ree (2013) was downloaded from the NCBI sequence read archive (SRA072507). It includes data from 13 closely related taxa in the flowering plant genus Pedicularis sequenced with Illumina GAIIx, yielding 69 bp single end reads with barcodes and restriction sites removed. In contrast to the small simulated datasets that exhibit locus dropout due to bioinformatic errors alone, the empirical data have missing sequences owing to additional factors such as disruption to restriction sites and variation in sequencing coverage. It also contains low quality base calls and paralogs that must be filtered, making a comparison of PyRAD versus Stacks more difficult for this analysis.

To control for differences in how the two programs apply such filters, initial quality filtering was implemented only in PyRAD, with the resulting sequences analyzed by both programs. Stacks has fewer explicit filters to detect paralogs, but the closest approximations were used, and I report the results with and without paralog filters applied. The default parameters in PyRAD (maxHaplos = 2, maxH = 3, maxSharedH = 3) were closely matched by using the following parameters, or manual edits, in Stacks, respectively: allowing only two haplotypes in a locus (–max_locus_stacks = 2), removing loci from the final catalog if they contain more than four heterozygous sites and removing stacks from the catalog if more than three samples are heterozygous for the same site. A clustering threshold of 85% was implemented in PyRAD, equivalent to 10 base differences in Stacks (parameters -m2, -M8, -N10, -n10) given the read lengths.

Detailed parameter settings and scripts to reproduce all simulated and empirical analyses are available as an IPython Notebook in the Supplementary Materials. Statistics measuring the distribution of taxon coverage across each assembled dataset were measured from the results of each analysis found in either the ‘.haplotypes.tsv’ output of Stacks or in the ‘.stats’ output of PyRAD. Run times were also compared, where each analysis was run separately on a Linux machine with 24 3.47 GHz Intel Xeon processors, using 12 parallel processes in PyRAD or 12 threads in Stacks.

3 RESULTS

3.1 Simulation results

For the three small simulated datasets both Stacks and PyRAD retained all reads through the de-multiplexing and initial filtering steps. Similarly, within-sample clustering accurately recovered all 10 K stacks for each taxon when either program analyzed the noIndels dataset. In the lowIndels and highIndels datasets, PyRAD performed nearly identically, recovering an average of 10 000.0 and 10 000.2 consensus sequences per sample, respectively, whereas Stacks recovered an average of 10 027.4 and 10 087.4 consensus sequences per sample, a result of splitting loci that are polymorphic for one or more indels within a sample.

The effect of indels is more pronounced when clustering across samples, where RAD sequences are more likely to exhibit indel variation. PyRAD recovered 10 001, 10 003 and 10 086 loci in the three datasets with increasing proportions of indels, while Stacks recovered 10 000, 12 226 and 16 285, respectively. Because only 10 000 loci were simulated, those recovered beyond this number represent the splitting of loci caused by a failure to identify homology. Levels of sequence divergence are equal across the three datasets because indels were introduced by replacing mutations—meaning their phylogenetic distribution is identical to that of other mutations—thus, the different results represent the effect of indel variation alone.

PyRAD identifies homology almost equally across the three datasets (Fig. 3), whereas Stacks performs worse when the data contain more indels, to the point of splitting nearly half the loci in the highIndels dataset into multiple loci shared by fewer taxa. This led to lower average taxon coverage per locus in the assembled Stacks datasets, as well as fewer loci with full coverage across all taxa (Table 1). In all three small simulated datasets the PyRAD analysis finished in approximately half the time of Stacks.

Fig. 3.

Comparison of PyRAD (black circles) versus Stacks (gray circles) in assembling simulated RADseq datasets that differ in their amount of indel variation. The two programs perform identically in the absence of indels (no indels), but in the presence of indels (low indels and high indels), Stacks splits loci with indel variation into multiple loci with lower taxon coverage. Meaning a greater number of loci are shared across fewer taxa. PyRAD, in contrast, is little affected by indels and recovers higher taxon coverage across all indel-containing datasets

Fig. 3.

Comparison of PyRAD (black circles) versus Stacks (gray circles) in assembling simulated RADseq datasets that differ in their amount of indel variation. The two programs perform identically in the absence of indels (no indels), but in the presence of indels (low indels and high indels), Stacks splits loci with indel variation into multiple loci with lower taxon coverage. Meaning a greater number of loci are shared across fewer taxa. PyRAD, in contrast, is little affected by indels and recovers higher taxon coverage across all indel-containing datasets

Table 1.

Comparison of PyRAD and Stacks in assembling simulated and empirical RADseq datasets of different sizes (Ntaxa & Nloci) and with different proportions of indels

Data Ntaxa Nloci Software Avg.cov %Full.cov Time 
noIndel 12 10 K PyRAD 12.0 100.0 0.31 
noIndel 12 10 K Stacks 12.0 100.0 0.62 
lowIndel 12 10 K PyRAD 12.0 100.0 0.34 
lowIndel 12 10 K Stacks 9.8 81.5 0.65 
highIndel 12 10 K PyRAD 11.9 99.1 0.32 
highIndel 12 10 K Stacks 7.4 56.3 0.70 
noIndel-m 12 500 K PyRAD 4.5 0.1 10.47 
noIndel-m 12 500 K PyRAD2.9 0.1 2.95 
noIndel-m 12 500 K Stacks 4.5 0.1 25.70 
empirical 13 178 K PyRAD 3.0 1.4 36.42 
empirical 13 207 K Stacks 2.7 0.9 79.25 
empirical-p 13 181 K PyRAD 2.9 1.1 36.42 
empirical-p 13 214 K Stacks 2.4 0.5 79.25 
Data Ntaxa Nloci Software Avg.cov %Full.cov Time 
noIndel 12 10 K PyRAD 12.0 100.0 0.31 
noIndel 12 10 K Stacks 12.0 100.0 0.62 
lowIndel 12 10 K PyRAD 12.0 100.0 0.34 
lowIndel 12 10 K Stacks 9.8 81.5 0.65 
highIndel 12 10 K PyRAD 11.9 99.1 0.32 
highIndel 12 10 K Stacks 7.4 56.3 0.70 
noIndel-m 12 500 K PyRAD 4.5 0.1 10.47 
noIndel-m 12 500 K PyRAD2.9 0.1 2.95 
noIndel-m 12 500 K Stacks 4.5 0.1 25.70 
empirical 13 178 K PyRAD 3.0 1.4 36.42 
empirical 13 207 K Stacks 2.7 0.9 79.25 
empirical-p 13 181 K PyRAD 2.9 1.1 36.42 
empirical-p 13 214 K Stacks 2.4 0.5 79.25 

Note: Performance is measured as the average number of samples recovered per locus (Avg.cov) and percentage of Nloci with data recovered from all samples in Ntaxa (%Full.cov). The noIndel-m and empirical datasets experience locus dropout from mutations to restriction sites, and the latter also from variable quality and sequencing coverage. Run times (hours) are compared for assemblies using 12 processors. When hierarchical clustering was implemented in PyRAD (*) with a minimum coverage of four, it greatly reduced run times while still retaining all full coverage loci. Empirical results are shown with paralog filters applied (-p) and without. The number of recovered loci (Nloci) was used to calculate %Full.cov.

3.1.1 Large hierarchical clustering results

Both programs recovered similar results for the large noIndel-m dataset in terms of average taxon coverage and number of loci shared across all taxa (Table 1). Stacks took >25 h to run, while PyRAD finished in about half that time. Hierarchical clustering in PyRAD improved speed significantly, reducing the run time to less than 3 h, but at the cost of reducing the average taxon coverage across the dataset by one-third. However, it had no effect on the percentage of loci recovered across all taxa, as the data that were excluded during hierarchical clustering represent loci shared by few samples. For large datasets that include many sampled individuals and large numbers of loci, the dramatic reduction in run times achieved through this approach will be useful.

3.2 Empirical results

When assembled by PyRAD the empirical dataset recovered 181 289 loci of which 56.4% were singletons, but for which >43 K had taxon coverage of four or more, and 2465 were recovered across all taxa. In comparison, Stacks recovered 213 742 loci with a greater proportion of singletons (59.4%) and only 1940 loci shared across all taxa (Table 1). This difference is more striking after applying paralog filters to both analyses, wherein PyRAD recovers 1989 loci across all taxa but stacks recovers only 1123. Overall, PyRAD recovered more loci at high taxon coverage and fewer loci at low coverage than Stacks (Fig. 4). In contrast to the simulated datasets, these results show clearly that locus dropout is a true feature of empirical data regardless of the bioinformatic method used. We should not expect to recover 100% of data across samples, especially when they are highly divergent, but to the extent homology is present among sequences in the dataset, I show here that PyRAD has greater ability to detect it.

Fig. 4.

The log difference in number of loci recovered at each level of taxon coverage from the empirical RADseq dataset of Eaton and Ree (2013) when analyzed by PyRAD and Stacks. Below the center line, Stacks recovered more loci (gray), while above the line, PyRAD recovered more (black). Circles indicate the comparison on data not filtered for paralogs and the bars after filtering for paralogs. PyRAD recovered more loci shared across a greater number of taxa, making its assembled dataset more phylogenetically informative

Fig. 4.

The log difference in number of loci recovered at each level of taxon coverage from the empirical RADseq dataset of Eaton and Ree (2013) when analyzed by PyRAD and Stacks. Below the center line, Stacks recovered more loci (gray), while above the line, PyRAD recovered more (black). Circles indicate the comparison on data not filtered for paralogs and the bars after filtering for paralogs. PyRAD recovered more loci shared across a greater number of taxa, making its assembled dataset more phylogenetically informative

In the minimally phylogenetic informative dataset (taxon covarage greater than three) from the paralog filtered empirical PyRAD output, 32% of loci contained at least one indel, and of the loci with full taxon coverage, 15% contained indels. Comparing these values to the frequency of indels in the small simulated datasets, where 21 and 48% of loci contained indels (for the lowIndels and highIndels datasets, respectively) shows that the simulated values represent realistic proportions of indel variation as expected across a similar sized dataset at a shallow phylogenetic scale.

4 DISCUSSION

4.1 RADseq at the phylogenetic scale

One of the greatest barriers to RADseq phylogenetics stems from the significant amounts of missing data that are expected to result from mutations to restriction recognition sites. However, no empirical studies have yet shown whether this form of locus dropout is in fact the primary source of missing data. Instead, insufficient sequencing coverage and a failure to identify homology during bioinformatic analyses may account for a significant proportion of locus dropout, particularly in studies at shallow phylogenetic scales. Here I show that PyRAD performs better than the current de facto alternative software for assembling RADseq datasets from divergent samples that include realistic proportions of indel variation.

Indel variation is common even within a single species (Mullaney et al., 2010), and thus, it should be no surprise that restriction-site–associated libraries often sample regions containing such variation. Within repetitive DNA elements (i.e. simple sequence repeats, microsatellites), indels can arise rapidly through slipped-strand mispairing during DNA replication (Levinson and Gutman, 1987), giving rise to single or often tandem repeat nucleotide differences between taxa. While it is typically desirable to exclude large repetitive genomic regions from phylogenetic analyses (attempted by pyRAD within the framework of ‘paralog filtering’), the probability any locus contains at least a single or few short repeat bases is high. Rather than excluding or splitting loci that differ by short repeats, accurately clustering and aligning them across disparate species will help to create more complete and phylogenetically informative datasets.

4.2 Options and extensions

4.2.1 Paired-end reads and sequence overlap

PyRAD uses two methods that greatly improve the speed and quality of paired-end library assemblies. The first is specific to paired ddRAD libraries for which first and second reads are subtended by different restriction enzyme cut sites. Here, first and second reads can either be analyzed separately and treated as unlinked loci (ddRAD method), concatenated and treated as long contigs (concatenated ddRAD method) or clustered by only their first reads but with second read data kept associated with first read clusters (split ddRAD method). The first approach loses information about linkage of the paired reads. The second method retains this information, but requires greater computation because of longer read lengths, while the third, ‘split ddRAD clustering’, offers a dramatic speed improvement over clustering longer concatenated reads while also retaining linkage information. It also allows assembling more highly divergent second reads, which often contain low-quality base calls.

The second feature PyRAD offers for paired-end data is the ability to identify partial overlap among sequences. This proves particularly useful for paired-end ddRAD or GBS libraries that suffer from variable size selection, which can result in overlap among paired-end reads or between single-end reads sequenced from either end of short GBS fragments. Using reverse complement clustering, contigs are constructed from overlapping regions with sufficient coverage to make consensus base calls. This allows building contigs longer than individual read lengths and increases quality by combining sequences with high-quality base reads at either end. Most importantly, it reduces duplication that would result from treating partially overlapping reads as separate loci.

4.2.2 Introgression analyses

PyRAD is being developed to include a number of analysis tools in addition to data assembly. This currently includes measurement of D-statistics (Durand et al., 2011) and related tests for genomic introgression (Eaton and Ree, 2013). For this, PyRAD uses the distribution of RADseq markers as putatively unlinked loci and performs non-parametric bootstrapping. A number of options are available to optimize the amount of shared data across samples when performing these tests, including SNP-based tests and averaging allele counts across multiple sampled individuals.

5 CONCLUSION

PyRAD performs de novo assembly of RADseq datasets, including RAD, GBS, ddRADseq and paired-end options. It is designed to perform equally well from population to phylogenetic scales and is currently being implemented across this range, from linkage analyses among siblings to clade-level phylogenies with hundreds of tips. A major goal of this software was ease of use, and for this reason, it uses common file formats familiar to those working in phylogenetics and offers a variety of output formats for downstream analyses, from SNP and allelic data to individual or concatenated loci. Because the software does not need to be compiled, PyRAD is easy to install on any desktop or computing cluster. It does not require large memory usage, and an analysis can be easily split into multiple shorter-length jobs through its step-wise execution.

Acknowledgement

Many thanks to R. Ree, B. Rubin, A. Hipp, M. Escudero and K. Ramanauskas for motivating the development of PyRAD, helping to identify bugs and for their many suggestions. Thanks also to R. Edgar whose software underlies much of this program and to two anonymous reviewers for improvements to the manuscript.

Funding: This research was supported by a National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant (DEB-1110598).

Conflict of Interest: none declared.

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Author notes

Associate Editor: David Posada

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