Abstract

Forty children aged 6–12 yr undergoing appendicectomy were allocated randomly to receive postoperative i.v. morphine by a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system (bolus dose 20 μg kg−1 with a lockout interval of 5 min) or the same PCA with a background infusion of morphine 20 μg kg−1 h−1 Patients breathed air and oxygen saturation was monitored by continuous pulse oximetry. Scores for pain, sedation and nausea were recorded hourly. Patients with PCA + background infusion received significantly more morphine than those with PCA only. Both groups selfadministered similar amounts of morphine using the PCA machine. There were no significant differences in the pain scores of the two groups. Patients with PCA + background infusion suffered more nausea (P < 0.01), more sedation (P < 0.05) and hypoxaemia (P < 0.001) than those with PCA only. They also had a better sleep pattern than those with PCA only. (Br. J. Anaesth. 1993; 71: 670–673).

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