COLLINGWOOD'SThe Principles of Art,1 unlike his earlier Outlines of a Philosophy of Art,2 appears to be very much what the title indicates. The aesthetic experience of the audience is mentioned but a few times and in chapter XIV it is studied largely in respect of the audience's role in the co-creation of art, while aesthetic response to nature and mere artefacts is mentioned only in one place (PA, pp. 307–308). PA would therefore appear to require a companion volume on the philosophy of aesthetic response. Yet, I shall argue, PA itself contains the materials for its own completion.

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I shall take it for granted that Collingwood, in PA, has shown that art proper is the expression of originally vague and inchoate emotions in articulate and detailed forms in order to know what one is thinking...

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