A great deal of effort has been expended within both of these excellent books in order to contribute to the transformation of the philosophical study of sound and auditory perception. A particular concern motivating these and other recent studies has been to shift the weight of emphasis both conceptually and methodologically away from vision. One only need cast an eye along a library shelf for thirty seconds in order to see that studies of perception have long been dominated by assumptions and arguments originating in the visual domain, and that work on the other senses has been dominated by a guiding assumption that what works for vision can be generalized across into the other senses. These books will certainly help to...

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