Over the past decade policing studies in South Africa have made considerable advances. For example, historical enquiries into the nature of Apartheid policing have contributed to an appreciation of the composite political imperatives which shape police institutions as guardians of regime security (Brewer & Brewer, 1994; Cawthra, 1993). From such studies it is clear the depiction of Apartheid policing as an undiluted form of colonial policing is neither accurate nor particularly helpful. Second, conceptual engagements with policing arrangements beyond Apartheid have considered the implications of global developments in policing for the restructuring of security in South Africa (Brogden & Shearing, 1993). These analyses have begun to challenge narrow, state-centered approaches to police reform and have argued for...

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