Criminals and Their Scientists (2006) approaches the history of criminology as a history of discursive practices rather than conceiving as criminological knowledge as a progressive discourse. Seeking to understand how criminological thought emerged as a disciplinary knowledge formation, this volume examines how discursive choices echo the intellectual, social, and political contexts of a particular place and time.

The various problematizations that enabled and constrained constitution of specific subjects of power and knowledge are explored by interrogating the discursive rules and conditions of possibility for criminological discourses about criminals as mediated through the voices of experts, practitioners and criminals themselves. For example, Criminals and Their Scientists traces the shift from a moral-ethical to a medical-anthropological perspective in criminological discourse that yielded the ability...

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