The first aim of the book, as Quenivet explains in her introduction, is to compare ‘feminist writings with the current state of international law, regarding sexual offences during armed conflicts’ (p. xvi). The second aim she sets herself is ‘to see whether feminist claims still stand, i.e., whether international law has offered to feminists a satisfying answer’ (p. xvii). The title of the book and the table of contents are therefore slightly deceptive, for one is led to believe that the topic is an analysis of the issue of sexual offences in armed conflict and its relationship to the broader subject of international law. Instead the aim is to assess the ‘feminists’ and their contribution in this area, therefore a subtitle mentioning...

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