Much of the very best criminological work on asylum policy and state crime has, perhaps unsurprisingly, come out of Australia (see, e.g. Pickering 2005; Weber 2002; Grewcock 2007; Poynting et al. 2004), unsurprisingly because Australia has a dark history when it comes to institutional racism, and exclusionary asylum and immigration policy. It is precisely this history that has inspired the breadth of critical asylum and immigration scholarship. What distinguishes Mike Grewcock's important monograph, however, is that it deals specifically with the historical and political context that has made asylum policy and refugee issues so fiercely contested in this part of the southern hemisphere. Building on many years of research, Grewcock provides new theoretical and historical clarity on Australia's role in the criminalization and demonization of asylum seekers in the twenty-first century. More importantly, his work reveals the criminal strategies that the Australian state has systematically employed...

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