Anyone who reads this book will read differently afterwards. Whilst it is a commonplace that reading is an act of envisioning that generates a metamorphic stream of mental images, there is little good scholarship that analyses this process of internal visualisation, or considers its cultural significance in relation either to the figurative dimension of literary language or to the traditions of illustration. Perhaps this is in part because of the apparent nebulousness of the subject, which John Harvey acknowledges at the outset: ‘One might ask, how can we possibly know what different people see, in their mind’s eye, as they read?’ Harvey’s book is founded upon the confident response that ‘prompts in texts work in a way that is easy to analyse: and it deserves analysis...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.