Abstract

Evocations of the ‘sharing economy’ claim disruptions through digital technology. Style is put forward to focus on subtle changes to the form and content of work through digital sharing. Digital sharing is a postwork style with ambiguous implications for worker identity and expression. Digital technologies share work through distributing the workplace beyond a fixed location and by enrolling individuals as workers through processes of communication circulation. These styles of sharing challenge fixed spaces and times of work with utopian and dystopian postwork possibilities. This argument is supported through practices of shared digital work constituting co-working offices in Manchester, Cambridge and London.

J, O, R
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