In recent decades two themes have been stressed in work on late medieval Scotland. The first of these is the interaction of Scotland with neighbouring realms and communities. Studies have demonstrated the desire of Scots to tap into wider trends and networks, perhaps inevitable in a small, poor and potentially isolated nation the inhabitants of which sought enrichment, material and cultural, through such contacts. Secondly, there has been consideration of Scotland's stability and cohesion as a polity: how far the promotion of structures of royal or civic ideology cut through the diverse, regionalised traditions which had previously defined Scotland as much as the crown. Katie Stevenson's study of chivalry and knighthood in fifteenth-century Scotland represents a valuable contribution to both debates. Building on general analyses of European chivalry, especially by Keen and Vale, Stevenson provides a consideration of the presence and significance...

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