In the Lumberman's Frontier, Thomas Cox explores how individuals conquered nature and created conditions for a lumberman's frontier to emerge in places where trees served as the primary draw for settlers and capital. Cox traces the development of this frontier across time and place from colonial New England to New York, Pennsylvania, the Great Lakes states, the Gulf South, and the West. Each frontier exhibited unique characteristics while drawing on earlier developments. By including stories of settlers, lumbermen, and industrialists, Cox emphasizes how individual values and activities shaped each frontier and addresses larger questions about labor transformation, technological innovation, and changing perceptions of the forest.

Cox's story commences along the banks of Maine's Kennebec and Penobscot, where trees...

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