Our understanding of the Ludlow massacre will never be the same. In this beautifully written environmental history of the southern Colorado coalfields, Thomas Andrews has reimagined the notorious 1914 episode from a clash of irreconcilable ideologies into a protracted battle for control over the local landscape. Rather than seeking to resolve ongoing debates about the relative roles of corporate avarice, state collusion, or labor radicalism in the violence of 1914, Andrews instead uncovers the powerful dependency on coal that shaped the context of economic growth during the industrial revolution of the late nineteenth century and locked coal mining centers into patterns of production unprecedented in mining history. Andrews has found that the energy behind the social conflict in the...

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