Recent years have seen a massive increase in interest in emotions not just among historians but also across the humanities and in the natural sciences. Some observers have already proclaimed an ‘emotional turn’ in cultural studies more generally. To be sure, historians have long been interested in emotions. As early as 1941, Lucien Febvre, the co-founder of the Annales, called for a history of the ‘emotional life of man in all its manifestations’. More recently, historians such as Peter Stearns, William Reddy and Joanna Bourke have made important contributions to the history of emotions in other national contexts. Yet these theoretical proposals and practical examples have rarely informed the writing of German history. Perhaps more so than in other national historiographies, the dominating social science paradigm after 1945 tended to...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this article.