Hans Litten, a German-Jewish lawyer, ‘crossed’ Hitler in different ways, not only cross-examining him in one of the most famous trials of the Weimar Republic, but making him angry in the process—and paying the price once the Nazi leader was in power. Litten is relatively unknown in Germany today, even less so in the English-speaking world, and Benjamin Carter Hett's biography represents the first major English-language publication on Litten's life since the 1940s, when Litten's mother Irmgard published her account of her son's struggle.

Hett's book is divided into three major parts, the first recounting Litten's youth in East Prussia and his subsequent transformation into a revolutionary socialist and celebrity lawyer in Berlin. The second part focuses on Litten's string of high-profile court cases and his arguably biggest moment, the cross-examination of Hitler in the infamous Eden Dance Palace trial in 1931, while the last part traces Litten's suffering under...

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